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Patient Education and Forms

Patient Education

The healthcare team at Texas Orthopedic Hospital, along with the physicians of the Fondren Orthopedic Group, encourage you to play an active role in your healthcare decision making process.  This begins with an individualized treatment plan.  This includes:  being informed about your current medical condition, discussing options to correct your orthopedic issue(s), and establishing a recovery process to maximize your outcome. 

Being knowledgeable about what to expect will help to decrease your anxiety and promote a quicker and less stressful recovery for you.

Learn About:

Out-Patient Education

Preadmission Department

The staff within the Preadmission Department will assist you in pre-registering for your surgical procedure. If you have been instructed to visit this department prior to your surgery, you will also see an anesthesiologist and a preadmission nurse. This team will determine if you will also need to be seen by your medical doctor prior to surgery for a pre- surgical medical clearance.  If required, this must be completed prior to your date of surgery.

The anesthesiologist will tell you what medications to take prior to surgery and what medications to take on the morning of your surgery.  If you take COUMADIN, PLAVIX, ASPIRIN or any Aspirin products, MOTRIN, ADVIL or any of the anti-inflammatories, you must talk to your surgeon about when to stop them before surgery.If there is a change in your medical condition prior to your surgery, please notify your surgeon immediately.

If you would like to expedite the pre-admission process, you may call to preregister: 713-794-3431 during the hours of 8am to 5pm Monday through Friday.

Preparation for Your Surgery

Why is it important not to eat or drink anything after midnight the night prior to your surgery?

This is for your SAFETY and assists in preventing stomach contents from getting into your lungs and causing potential harm to you. This includes candy, chewing gum, throat lozenges and/or chewing tobacco. Upon brushing your teeth, be sure not to swallow any water.

On the day of your surgery, please wear loose, comfortable clothing.

DO NOT wear contact lenses, nail polish, hair spray, body lotion, perfume/cologne or make up.

Bring your dentures, hearing aides and glasses, along with any storage cases you have for them.

If you have had a previous related surgery and already own certain medical equipment (ex. walker, crutches, cane), please bring your equipment in for evaluation. Please make sure to label it with your name.

Please leave jewelry and other valuables at home.

Be sure to make arrangements for a responsible adult to drive you home upon discharge from the hospital. Additionally, it is recommended that someone to stay with you for the first 24-48 hours after discharge.

Bring all of your maintenance medications with you to the hospital. Maintenance medications are for diabetes, cholesterol, heart, blood pressure, seizures, thyroid, ulcer and arthritis. They must arrive in their original containers and reviewed with your preoperative nurse. Be prepared to tell the nurse when your last dose was taken and the quantity.

Plan to arrive at the hospital promptly at the time your surgeon's office scheduled with you. You may bring a book or magazine to read while you are waiting to go to surgery. You may also bring a toy or game for pediatric patients.

Day Of Surgery

On arrival to the hospital, you may park in the parking garage or use the valet service.Take the elevators to the first floor of the parking garage and proceed into the hospital. Security will be available guide you in the right direction. Tell the officer who your surgeon is and you will be directed to either the first or second floor registration/waiting areas.

You will be registered, admitted and escorted to the preoperative area.

If you did not already complete the preadmission process in advance, registration will take a little longer in order to complete necessary paperwork. Please make sure to bring your photo identification and insurance cards with you.

An identification bracelet will be placed on your arm or leg. Please expect to repeat your name and date of birth to various staff members. This is for verification purposes as well as for your protection and safety.

Please note that there are magazines and a television provided in each waiting area for your enjoyment while you wait.You may also bring personal items, such as books, needlepoint, or crossword puzzles and toys or games for children, if desired.

Preoperative Area

You will be asked to change into a gown, slippers and may be given blankets to keep you warm.

You will meet your preoperative nurse, operating room nurse, an anesthesiologist and a certified registered nurse anesthetist.

One of the staff will place an IV (usually in your arm) for you to receive medications.

You will be asked about your last dose of current medications and the date and time that you last took them.

Medications

Texas Orthopedic Hospital allows patients to bring certain home medications to be taken during your hospital stay. These medications MUST be approved by your physician. These medications include maintenance medications for diabetes, cholesterol, heart, blood pressure, seizure, thyroid, ulcer and arthritis. Medications are to be brought with you in the original container placed in the zip lock bag provided and given to a family member during surgery.

Any non-approved medications include over the counter medications (OTC), vitamins, herbals, sleeping pills, pain and anxiety medications. PLEASE DO NOT BRING THESE MEDICATIONS TO THE HOSPITAL.

Anesthesia

General Anesthesia –this anesthesia makes you unconscious for the period during the actual surgery. Once the surgery is completed, you will slowly wake up and be transported to the recovery area.

Regional Anesthesia – anesthesia is placed around the nerves of the site that is affected. It blocks the feeling at the site for a period of time during the operation and up to 16 hours after to help with pain control.

Local Anesthetic – this blocks the feeling and prevents pain during the procedure while you are awake.

Sedation – this is a medication that is given to calm you during an otherwise anxious time. It is usually given to you just before surgery or during any procedures that may be uncomfortable.

Pain Management Service – The hospital offers specialized doctors who are knowledgeable about controlling pain. Patients with chronic pain or other conditions may benefit from these services

The hospital utilizes a group of Anesthesiologists that have maintained great working relations with the surgeons. They provide excellent care to our patients and offer experience and expertise. For more information about the Greater Houston Anesthesiology Group, you are encouraged to visit: http://choosegha.com

Operative Area

Once you have been taken back to the Operating Room, your family/friends may wait for you in our waiting area. There is a cafeteria and vending machines located on the first floor of the hospital. A pager will be provided to your guest(s) and will buzz when medical updates are available.

No guests will be permitted to go into the operating room of the hospital.

Our staff will let your guest(s) know how you are doing and when you can expect to go home.

Post Anesthesia Care Unit Recovery Area

PHASE I

  • After your surgery, you will be brought to the recovery area to be monitored and wake up
  • You will receive pain medicine to keep you comfortable
  • You will be given ice chips and sips of liquid to make sure you are able to tolerate something on your stomach
  • Your family/friends will be given an update as to how you are doing as they wait in the waiting area
  • During this phase family is not usually allowed in the unit

Your surgeon may decide to admit you to our Inpatient Unit for observation after your surgery. If your surgeon feels this is necessary, he will discuss your plan of care with you. *For this reason, it is always beneficial to pack basic toiletries as well as an extra set of loose, comfortable clothing.

PHASE II

  • During Phase II of your recovery, you will continue to be monitored
  • The post operative nurse will spend time explaining your discharge instructions to you and to the person/people accompanying you
  • You may have specific instructions from your surgeon as well
  • You may also receive instructions from Physical Therapy/Occupational Therapy before you go home
  • You MUST have a responsible person to drive you home
  • You will receive prescriptions during your discharge instructions
  • Make sure to have each prescription filled by your preferred pharmacy
  • If you are given a prescription for pain medication, DO NOT drink alcohol or drive while taking this medication
  • Plan to have someone stay with you for the first 24 hours following your surgery as you may need help around the house or with errands
  • You may NOT drive for 24 hours after anesthesia
  • On the next day, a nurse will call to check on your status and to answer any further questions that you may have
  • A therapist may come to your bedside during the discharge process
  • You will be taught how to use your crutches and to move around in your home environment
  • You will be given a walker, crutches, post-op shoes, cast shoes or an arm sling if needed because of your surgery
  • Your post-operative nurse will review your discharge instructions with you and the person(s) accompanying you
  • You will be taught to watch for signs of infection
  • You will be taught to care for your incision
  • You will need to call your physician to make a follow up appointment usually 10-14 days after surgery


  • You will need to call your physician if:
    • You have a temperature greater than 101
    • You cannot urinate or have difficulty urinating
    • You have not had a bowel movement within three days
    • You have pain unrelieved by prescribed pain medication from your doctor
    • You have persistent nausea and vomiting
    • You have excessive bleeding or drainage
    • You have redness, and/or swelling around or near the operative site
    • You have any unusual symptoms, concerns or questions

Physical Therapy

Discharge

If you are unable to reach your physician and are in need of medical assistance, please go to the nearest emergency room and have the staff notify your physician.

Watch For Impaired Circulation and Report:

  • Any prolonged numbness or swelling
  • Severe pain not controlled by medication, ice or elevation
  • Pale or blue color to nail beds/blanching
  • Tingling/cold to the touch
  • Increased swelling below the cast/splint or dressing

Do not get casts or splints wet.

In-Patient Education

Preadmission Department

The staff within the Preadmission Department will assist you in pre-registering for your surgical procedure. If you have been instructed to visit this department prior to your surgery, you will also see an anesthesiologist and a preadmission nurse. This team will determine if you will also need to be seen by your medical doctor prior to surgery for a pre-surgical medical clearance. If required, this must be completed prior to your date of surgery.

The anesthesiologist will tell you what medications to take prior to surgery and what medications to take prior to surgery and what medications to take on the morning of your surgery. If you take COUMADIN, PLAVIX, ASPIRIN or any Aspirin products, MOTRIN, ADVIL or any of the anti-inflammatories, you must talk to your surgeon about when to stop them before surgery. If there is a change in your medical condition prior to your surgery, please notify your surgeon immediately.

If you would like to expedite the pre-admission process, you may call to preregister: 713-794-3431 during the hours of 8am to 5pm Monday through Friday.

Preparation for Your Surgery

Why is it important not to eat or drink anything after midnight the night prior to your surgery?

This is for your SAFETY and assists in preventing stomach contents from getting into your lungs and causing potential harm to you. This includes candy, chewing gum, throat lozenges and/or chewing tobacco. Upon brushing your teeth, be sure not to swallow any water.

On the day of your surgery, please wear loose, comfortable clothing.

DO NOT wear contact lenses, nail polish, hair spray, body lotion, perfume/cologne or make up.

Bring your dentures, hearing aides and glasses, along with any storage cases you have for them.

If you have had a previous related surgery and already own certain medical equipment (ex. walker, crutches, cane), please bring your equipment in for evaluation. Please make sure to label it with your name.

Please leave jewelry and other valuables at home.

Be sure to make arrangements for a responsible adult to drive you home upon discharge from the hospital. Additionally, it is recommended that someone to stay with you for the first 24-48 hours after discharge.

Bring all of your maintenance medications with you to the hospital. Maintenance medications are for diabetes, cholesterol, heart, blood pressure, seizures, thyroid, ulcer and arthritis. They must arrive in their original containers and reviewed with your preoperative nurse. Be prepared to tell the nurse when your last dose was taken and the quantity.

Plan to arrive at the hospital promptly at the time your surgeon's office scheduled with you. You may bring a book or magazine to read while you are waiting to go to surgery. You may also bring a toy or game for pediatric patients.

Day of Surgery

On arrival to the hospital, you may park in the parking garage or use the valet service. *Extended day parking passes are available for purchase at a discounted rate. See the parking attendant for details.

Take the elevators to the first floor of the parking garage and proceed into the hospital. Security will be available to guide you in the right direction. Tell the officer who your surgeon is and you will be directed to either the first or second floor registration/waiting areas.

You will be registered, admitted and escorted to the preoperative area.

If you did not already complete the preadmission process in advance, registration will take a little longer in order to complete necessary paperwork. Please make sure to bring your photo identification and insurance cards with you.

An identification bracelet will be placed on your arm or leg. Please expect to repeat your name and date of birth to various staff members. This is for verification purposes as well as for your protection and safety.

Please note that there are magazines and a television provided in each waiting area for your enjoyment. You may also bring personal items, such as books, needlepoint, or crossword puzzles and toys or games for children, if desired.

Pre-Operative Area

You will be asked to change into a gown, slippers and may be given blankets to keep you warm.

You will meet your preoperative nurse, operating room nurse, an anesthesiologist and a certified registered nurse anesthetist.

One of the staff will place an IV (usually in your arm) for you to receive medications. You will be asked about your last dose of current medications and the date and time that you last took them.

Medications

Texas Orthopedic Hospital allows you, the patient, to bring certain home medications to be taken during your hospital stay. These medications MUST be approved by your physician. This includes maintenance medications for diabetes, cholesterol, heart, blood pressure, seizure, thyroid, ulcer and arthritis. Medications are to be brought with you in the original container. These home medications will be checked in through the hospital's nursing staff and passed on to pharmacy to verify. Non-narcotic home medications can and will be dispensed; all narcotics/pain medications should be left at home and will be administered by the hospital pharmacy. All home medications will be locked in the room server upon arrival to your assigned in-patient bed.

Any non-approved medications include over the counter medications (OTC), vitamins, herbals, sleeping pills, pain and anxiety medications. PLEASE DO NOT BRING THESE MEDICATIONS TO THE HOSPITAL.

Anesthesia

General Anesthesia –this anesthesia makes you unconscious for the period during the actual surgery. Once the surgery is completed, you will slowly wake up and be transported to the recovery area.

Regional Anesthesia – anesthesia is placed around the nerves of the site that is affected. It blocks the feeling at the site for a period of time during the operation and up to 16 hours after to help with pain control.

Local Anesthetic – this blocks the feeling and prevents pain during the procedure while you are awake.

Sedation – this is a medication that is given to calm you during an otherwise anxious time. It is usually given to you just before surgery or during any procedures that may be uncomfortable.

Pain Management Service – The hospital offers specialized doctors who are knowledgeable about controlling pain. Patients with chronic pain or other conditions may benefit from these services

The hospital utilizes a group of Anesthesiologists that have maintained great working relations with the surgeons. They provide excellent care to our patients and offer experience and expertise. For more information about the Greater Houston Anesthesiology Group, you are encouraged to visit: http://choosegha.com

Operative Area

Once you have been taken back to the Operating Room, your family/friends may wait for you in our waiting area. There is a cafeteria and vending machines located on the first floor of the hospital. A pager will be provided to your guest(s) and will buzz when medical updates are available.

No guests will be permitted to go into the operating room of the hospital.

Our staff will let your guest(s) know how you are doing and when you can expect to go home.

Post Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU) Recovery Area

After your surgery, you will be brought to the recovery area will you will be monitored and gradually wake up.

You will receive pain medicine to keep you comfortable.

You will be given ice chips and sips of liquid to make sure you are able to tolerate something on your stomach.

Your family/friends will be given an update as to how you are doing and informed as to when you will be going up to the In-patient Unit (times may fluctuate between 45 minutes - 2 hours, occasionally longer depending on type of procedure and tolerance to pain and anesthesia).

Preventing Falls

Keep Things Within Reach

  • Keep items within easy reach, like water, tissues, television remote, call button, and telephone.
  • Ensure that you understand how to properly use your bed controls, your call bell, and your light controls.
  • Keeping your belongings in the same place and establishing a routine will be most helpful while in the hospital.

Get Help to Move Around

  • Your safety and well-being is top priority, please don't get up without calling for someone to assist you.
  • Sit up slowly and with help.
  • Utilize handrails in the bathroom and hallways.
  • Don't attempt to walk without the use of equipment and proper instruction.
  • A gait belt may be in use while moving around.  This is to support you as you walk with staff assistance.
  • If you become dizzy or nauseated, immediately notify your caregiver for assistance.

In-Patient Unit

You will be transferred to the In-patient Unit following your time in the PACU.

Your family/friends may be asked to exit the room during medical procedures.

You will be placed in your room and greeted by a floor admitting nurse. This nurse will orient you to the unit, as well as to your room (bed controls, call system, telephone, and more).

You will then be assigned a licensed nurse and a nursing assistant team per shift for the duration of your stay.

The nurse will be responsible for administering your medications, monitoring your IV, and ensuring adequate pain relief.

The nursing assistant will be responsible for monitoring your vital signs, assisting you with your a.m. care (ex. brushing teeth, changing linens, and bathing), as well as escorting you to and from the restroom and providing assistance in and out of the bed.

You will receive visits from a variety of healthcare professionals involved in your recovery process. This may include: Pain Management, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Internal Medicine, and/or Dietary.

During your stay, you may be visited by a Case Manager. This visit may address equipment needs, discharge planning options (ex. in-patient rehabilitation, out-patient rehabilitation, home health care).

Upon discharge from the unit, the nurse will go over discharge paperwork, including prescriptions that you will take to a local pharmacy of choice, you will receive any home medications that you brought into the building upon admission, and any equipment that may have been delivered during your stay.

A nursing assistant will take you and your belongings to your vehicle once you have reviewed all of your discharge paperwork with your nurse and have been released from the facility.

*You will not be permitted to drive yourself home so please make prior arrangements for a responsible driver.

At Texas Orthopedic, patients receive all pre-and post-operative care in a single area specially designed for patient ease and convenience.  From surgery to anesthesia to nursing, patients can relax knowing they are receiving quality specialty care with “state-of-the-art” technology.

All operating rooms are specially constructed and equipped to accommodate the particular demands of each surgical subspecialty-such as hands, knees or shoulders.  The rooms are designed to allow extra space for specialized equipment and multi-disciplined surgical teams trained to support the specific subspecialties.  An observation gallery between two of the operating rooms features video monitors, which allows authorized visitors to observe surgery from the surgeon’s point of view.


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7401 South Main Street
Houston,
Texas
77030
(713)799-8600